Flag of Lithuania

Creative Industries Lithuania

Global Development Lithuania at Red Yellow Blue (RYB)


Creative Industries Policy in Lithuania

The concept of creative industries has been considered in Lithuania since 2003, when the first studies in this field were conducted (by Dr M. Starkevičiūtė). Maps of the creative industries in Utena and Alytus counties were compiled in 2004–2005 (head of the project, Dr G. Mažeikis). The Strategy for the Promotion and Development of Creative Industries was prepared and approved in 2007. It provided a definition of creative industries and identified priority areas for development. Creative industries are defined in these documents as ‘activities based on an individual’s creative abilities and talent, the objective and result of which is intellectual property and which can create material wellbeing and work places’. The concept of creative industries in Lithuania includes the following: crafts, architecture, design, cinema and video art, publishing, visual arts, applied arts, music, software and computer services, the creation and broadcasting of radio and television programmes, advertising, dramatic art, and other areas which unite various aspects of cultural and economic activities.
PDF > esa.ee/cms-data/upload/files/CreativeIndustries_EstLatLit.pdf

Economy

After the country declared independence from the Soviet Union in 1990, Lithuania faced an initial dislocation that is typical during transitions from a planned economy to a free-market economy. Macroeconomic stabilization policies, including privatization of most state-owned enterprises, and a strong commitment to a currency board arrangement led to an open and rapidly growing economy and rising consumer demand. Foreign investment and EU funding aided in the transition. Lithuania joined the WTO in May 2001, the EU in May 2004, and the euro zone in January 2015, and is now working to complete the OECD accession roadmap it received in July 2015. In 2017, joined the OECD Working Group on Bribery, an important step in the OECD accession process.

The Lithuanian economy was severely hit by the 2008-09 global financial crisis, but it has rebounded and become one of the fastest growing in the EU. Increases in exports, investment, and wage growth that supported consumption helped the economy grow by 3.6% in 2017. In 2015, Russia was Lithuania’s largest trading partner, followed by Poland, Germany, and Latvia; goods and services trade between the US and Lithuania totaled $2.2 billion. Lithuania opened a self-financed liquefied natural gas terminal in January 2015, providing the first non-Russian supply of natural gas to the Baltic States and reducing Lithuania’s dependence on Russian gas from 100% to approximately 30% in 2016.

Lithuania’s ongoing recovery hinges on improving the business environment, especially by liberalizing labor laws, and improving competitiveness and export growth, the latter hampered by economic slowdowns in the EU and Russia. In addition, a steady outflow of young and highly educated people is causing a shortage of skilled labor, which, combined with a rapidly aging population, could stress public finances and constrain long-term growth.